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Prevalence Of Hypertension Among Adults In Selected Two Communities In Delta State Nigeria.

Jessica Amaka Ogbogbo

Abstract


This is an explorative survey carried out to find out the prevalence of hypertension among adults age 40 and above of two communities in Ika South Local Government Area of Delta State. Five Hundred and Twenty Five (525) respondents were selected based on availability and convenience. These respondents were drawn from two communities namely: Alihame and Ekuku-Agbor. Data was collected using structured interview, stethoscope, sphygmomanotneter and record from outpatient department in the health centers of the two communities. Findings show that the mean age and weight of respondents are 46 years and 64.4kg respectively. Forty-five percent (45%) respondents reported increase in systolic blood pressure: thirty-three percent (33%) had increase in diastolic blood pressure, while about twenty-two percent (22%) had increase in both systolic and diastolic blood pressure. There is twice the chance that a woman will be hypertensive than a man. Increase in blood pressure is highest between 41 and 60 years of age. The prevalence of hypertension is about fifty-eight percent (58%). The research questions; can age, gender, weight, life style, race and stress affect blood pressure was answered to indicate that age, stress, weight, life style, race can affect blood pressure but no significant effect of gender on blood pressure. It therefore follows that prevalence of hypertension in this Local Government is high. It was recommended that public enlightenment programme be organized to educate the people of this Local Government about the rate and the management of high blood pressure and also that government should make anti-hypertensive drugs readily available in primary health center.


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